Antique/Extant Clothing 1

For over 6 years {between 2011 and 2017}, I bought and restored antique clothing. I keep a record of the most interesting items I have sold here:-


Early Carrickmacross Lace Collar
Early Carrickmacross Lace Collar
Late 1820s/30s Carrickmacross Lace Collar
Late 1820s/30s Carrickmacross Lace Collar

Antique Late Regency 1820s/30s Carrickmacross Lace Collar Handmade Net Applique

This is a lovely early example of Carrickmacross lace. This collar is made from a honeycomb net, with appliqued muslin and needle worked fillings. It has a lovely ruffled/gathered frill.

Carrickmacross lace was begun around the early 1820s in Ireland. As the 19th century went on, machined Carrickmacross lace grew more and more popular, and so the handmade lace items had less and less of a market. This piece is an early handmade example, due to the style of motif, which is in imitation of the Dreseden laces of the 18th century; we have the lovely needle fillings here, produced to look like the pulled thread fillings so easily recognisable in Dresden lace.

Using my magnifier I can see fine buttonholing to the hem of the ruffled edge, and the couched hand stitches over the cordonnet (outline) thread around the motifs. Interestingly, there is a fine border of buttonholed points to the inner neck edge, which again point to the 1820s/30s, as does the overall shape of the collar, the centre front points of which would not meet once being worn.

Measurements:-
Inner Buttonholed Edge – 14″ or 35.5cm
Centre Back from Neck edge to Hem – 7″ or 18cm
Width taken right across from one side to other including frill – 21 1/2″ or 55cm

il_570xN.1217499602_bwic

il_570xN.1264713673_oxbk-2

il_570xN.1264715567_ctad-2

Panels of Antique Regency Gown – Early 1800s – Tamboured Crewel Wool on Muslin

These 3 panels are from an early 1800s Regency dress. There are two side panels, and one centre piece. What happened to the original dress I don’t know. But it is not surprising that this embroidery was saved. How beautiful it would have looked in its day. In the centre panel there are small, white tamboured motifs from the top down, and then either side is the bold, polychrome wool (crewel) embroidery. The design is wonderful; scrolling, trailing neo-classical flowers and leaves. The 2 side panels are plain apart from the same embroidered hem. The muslin is very fine. I wonder if the back piece had a train? If only it had survived!

Measurements:-

Centre Panel Lengths-
Side – 46″
Centre – 42″

Width at Hem – 42 1/2″

Straight Panels –
1.) 21 1/2″ x 44 1/2″
2.) 19″ x 44″

Condition:-
The muslin would have been a wonderful bright white originally. It is now an aged light grey/brownish colour, but this really isn’t noticeable apart from when the fabric is folded up. The 2 side panels are in quite good condition; there are a couple of holes, and there is some damage/stitch marks along the top and in the embroidered hem (it must have been taken up at some point). The centre panel has a fair amount of damage unfortunately. There are quite large holes/tears, and there are one or two antique darns, and there is a long antique darn in the embroidery to the hem. Along the top there is some discolouration, and there is also some discolouration to the rest of the panel, in patches. Some of the crewel embroidery has been worn away and is damaged.



Late Regency Silk Reticule
Late Regency Silk Reticule
1820s-30s Embroidered Silk Reticule
1820s-30s Embroidered Silk Reticule

c.1820s-30s Embroidered Silk Reticule

What a beautiful reticule. A bright pink silk satin, lined in ivory silk. Gorgeous embroidery to both front and back. The green silk ribbon drawstring is in very good condition, as is the whole bag. A silk thread has been looped around the bottom and sides. The fluffy, white silk flower heads make an unusual feature.

Measurements- 7.5cm across the top, 23.5cm from top to bottom of threads.

1795-1810s Regency Shawl - Tamboured Black Net
1795-1810s Regency Shawl – Tamboured Black Net

1795-1810s Regency Net Shawl with Silk Tambour Embroidery

To say that a shawl or stole of this era is rare is an under statement. I haven’t seen anything like this before (let alone had it in my hands). It is a super piece of needlework.

Measurements:- Width – 49 cms or 19″ Length – 300 cms or 118″

The shawl or stole is made with a black net, and has been tamboured with silk coloured thread. Beautiful. The edge of the stole has a lovely curved shape, and above that is a flower, stem and leaf motif. At both ends are a group of 7 motifs, in differing sizes.

Condition:- of course there are some holes through this piece, but nothing too dreadful. The worst section of damage is to one of the ends, and it can be seen in the bottom mosaic to the left, bottom right square, and there is also a section to the side with a hole, which can be seen in the bottom right square. The top right photo shows a section of small holes, and there are a few areas like this in other sections of the stole, but considering its age, it is in such great condition.

Regency Fichu with Bucks Point Lace
Regency Fichu with Bucks Point Lace

Regency 1810-1820 Muslin Fichu with Bucks Lace Trim – Superb Condition

This Regency era fichu or kerchief is so beautifully made. A very fine muslin edged with a wide Bucks Point lace trim. The motif running along the edge of the lace looks to me like big chestnut trees. The stripes are not fine tucks but are part of the weave of the fabric. It is a wonderful piece of extant Regency clothing. Now the lace is present on all 3 sides (not just the normal 2). So other than simply being the choice of the lady who wore it, it could be a kerchief worn around the head/over bonnets or headwear. If you have the fabulous “Napoleon and the Empire of Fashion” book, you will see that type of kerchief often used to adorn headwear. Condition:The muslin is in superb condition. I cannot see any holes or marks. To the lace there are a couple of areas of damage, just 2 very small holes in the net, and a couple to the tree shaped motifs. Incredible that it is in this condition.

Measurements:-
Top- 35″ or 89cm
Side- 23″ or 58cm

c.1840s Silk Reticule
c.1840s Silk Reticule

c.1830s Embroidered Silk Reticule

What a beautiful late Regency or Romantic era reticule.

It a gold silk purse, with perfectly stitched embroidery. At either side are green tassels with wooden moulds, which you can just see under the silk thread which has come away from the mould. Silk green cords are used to close it. The embroidery can be seen on both sides of the reticule.

Condition:-
The silk fabric is a little bit discoloured, on the front and back. The top part of it is the worst part, and it looks like the colour from the embroidery has run a bit here too. Inside is lovely and clean. Silk of this age always has some wear to it. It has come away a bit on the inside where the drawstring casing is. There is light wear to the outside. The green silk of the cording is also coming away from the centre fibres.

Measurements:-
Length- 7 1/2″ or 19cm
Width at widest part- 6″ or 15cm

Late Victorian Reticule with embroidery, spangles and beading
Late Victorian Reticule with embroidery, spangles and beading

Late Victorian Embroidered Silk Antique Reticule with Spangles, Beading and Embroidery

This unusual late Victorian (1880s/1890s) purse or reticule is made from a dull gold silk satin, and has the most unusual motif. It has a drawstring and the same cord continues over the top of the purse. The needle worked design is the same on the front and the back. So firstly we have a round, and padded satin stitch appliqué motif in the same colour as the bag which has been stitched onto the satin. Over that tiny beads, spangles, and embroidery has been added, creating a very colourful and eye catching piece of needlework.

Condition:-
The peach satin lining on the inside looks perfect, as is the cord. There are some patches of wear to the outside of the silk satin; this is mostly to the sides of the purse and where the drawstring casing has been used. There is also some wear to the drawstring casing on the inside. There are some repair stitches to the inside of the bag where the drawstring casing has come away from the lining, these are not original.
A fair few of the spangles are missing, to both the front and back.

Measurements:-
Length- 8 1/4″ or 21cm
Width- 6″ or 16cm

Late 1820s Early 1830s Collar
Late 1820s Early 1830s Collar

Details 1829s/30s Whiteworked Collar
Details 1829s/30s Whiteworked Collar

Late 1820s Early 1830s Whitework Embroidered Muslin Collar

This delightful late 1820s and into the 1830s white worked muslin collar is larger and more ornate than some others. It has a beautiful shape to it, with a deep, ruffled hem and a narrow section of openwork just above it. The edges are embroidered into tiny vandyke points, and another narrow strip of openwork is formed just above them. The embroidery features a swirling, flowing pattern, with small and simple leaves, and stems and buds in satin stitch. Two ends cross over one another to the centre front where a brooch or pin would have been used to affix them there.

Condition:- The neck has a slight yellowing to it, and there are some areas of wear to the front ties, which are due to the wearing of brooches or pins there. These areas can be seen in the bottom two photos of the last mosaic.

Measurements:- Centre Back- 9 1/4″ or 23.5cm. Width at its widest- 28″ or 71cm.

Late 1820s 1830s Muslin Ruffled Collar
Late 1820s 1830s Muslin Ruffled Collar
Detail of 1820s/30s Muslin Collar
Detail of 1820s/30s Muslin Collar

Late 1820s Early 1830s Muslin Collar with Tambour Embroidery

This delicate and beautiful muslin collar is in super condition. I have only ever seen one other of these in my time of trading in antique clothing. It is a lovely bright white, so someone gave this a good wash, and it has been very well looked after over the years. It consists of 2 sections, the large ruffled piece and then the collar section. The tambour embroidery is very interesting; there are flower heads and curling stems, and also squares and corners. Button hole stitch has been used on every edge. It crosses over at the front as is secured with 2 flattened hooks and 2 perfectly hand sewn bars.

Condition:- The only points of note can be viewed in the second mosaic. To the bottom right you can see there are a few very small holes, and in the bottom left photo you can just see some damage which is most evident on the inside; where the bottom hook has pulled away from the delicate fabric behind it.

Measurements:- Right along the Top of the Collar ~ 32 1/2″ or 83cm. Width at Widest Part (Centre Back) ~ 8″ or 20cm.

1830s Kid Gloves
1830s Kid Gloves

c.1830s Embroidered Kid Gloves with Tassels

These unusual 1830s gloves are so decorative. The embroidered motif in the middle of the glove is beautifully sewn; amazing work. But look at those tassels! Between them is a small strip of elastic. These strips are backed with the same leather as the gloves, so are original. Then we have beautiful red silk tassels, so pretty. They are exquisitely hand stitched.

Measurements:-Length- 20.5cm or 8″

These were made for a petite lady, and are a small size.


c.1830s-50s Black Lace Bonnet Veil
c.1830s-50s Black Lace Bonnet Veil

c.1830s-50s – Black Lace Bonnet Veil – East Midlands Point Lace

This super early Victorian black lace bonnet veil is Rococco in design which grew popular from the 1830s. The large hats and bonnets of the 1830s led to the size of bonnet veils getting progressively larger as well, and this is a large veil. The top has been folded over to have something threaded through it to then attach it to the bonnet.
I am far from an expert on lace, but it looks like East Midlands point lace to me. This is a little quirky as some of it is unfinished: there is a small section in the border to one side, and then to the other side, quite a large section lace near the hem.

Measurements:

Length~ 42″ (108cm)

Width~ 30″ (77cm)

Early 1800s Regency Chemisette
Early 1800s Regency Chemisette

Early 1800s Regency Chemisette

This Regency chemisette has a lovely high, ruffled collar onto a short body. The body of the chemisette is made up of 2 pattern pieces. (I am presuming that it was worn with a high necked gown.) Originally it would have been starched. There may have been one or two small mother of pearl or Dorset thread buttons on one side, and a hand sewn loop on the other side to fasten at the neck, or it could have been pinned. The hand stitching is of course, exquisite.

Condition:
There is some discolouration to the neck. There are also a couple of areas of small holes; one is on the right side to the back, the others to both sides on the centre front. These can be seen in the top 2 photos in the mosaic.

Measurements:-
Inside Neck – 33cm or 13″
Centre Back from top of collar to hem – 21.5cm or 8 2/8″

c.1860s Chemisette or Tucker
c.1860s Chemisette or Tucker

c.1860s Chemisette

This lace and organdy chemisette has a Valenciennes lace trim to the neckline, and again as insertion trim througout the bodice section. Also decorating the top half are strips of gathered organdy fabric, and a dotted muslin. All around the egde of this decorated section there is a narrow embroidered trim. There are 3 very small cloth buttons which fasten the chemisette at the front, with corresponding handsewn bars. Interestingly, along the bottom hem there are handsewn loops to guide the tape ties (now sadly cut off) through to where they are tied at the front.

Various clues point us in the direction of the 1860s; the wide and sloping shoulders, high neckline, the decorated upper section mirrors the square necklines of this decade, the gathered organdy sections remind me of the shirtwaists in that style. Valenciennes lace was of course very popular at this time.

Measurements: From shoulder to hem at the front~ 16 2/8” (42cm)

Late 1840s 1850s Lace Cap
Late 1840s 1850s Lace Cap

1840s 1850s Original Victorian White Cotton Cap with Piping and Lace 

This is a very pretty mid 19th century cap. By the 1840-50s, caps were becoming so small that they ended up by simply being pieces of lace and frippery on a lady’s head, such as the ‘fall caps’ of the 1860s.
This is made in a fine white muslin with an interesting stripe design. There is piping at the join between the ruffles and the front of the cap, and along the edge of the crown at the back. Along the edge of the cap there is some fine lace, and this is again added to the front brim. The ties that it came with were no good, so I have replaced those with strips of sheer fabric, handsewn by myself. I will add the original torn ties with this cap so that its purchaser can see them.
Measurements:
This is a small cap, so will fit a small head, and will not cover all the hair. The shapes and styles of caps were very plentiful during the 19th century; they didn’t all cover the entire head. This is a lovely genteel cap, worn for its decoration, and not to work in!
From centre top to bottom one side~ 8 1/2″ (22cm)

Mid 1800s Linen Cap
Mid 1800s Linen Cap

Mid 1800s Linen Cap – Rural Plain Sewing

This is a basic plain cap worn by those of the lower classes, during the middle of the nineteenth century. It is beautifully sewn, a super example of ‘plain’ home sewing.
This is very simply made, with rectangles of fabric gathered around the small crown at the back. It is all hand sewn of course. The ties are not self fabric ties, and I’m not quite sure if they are linen or cotton. There is one raw edge on the inside. The linen is a greyish colour.
Measurements:
This is a large cap, made to cover the head and hair.
Front Brim- 21″ (53cm)
Front to Centre Back one side- 10 1/4″ (26cm)

c.1800-1830 Undress Jacket
c.1800-1830 Undress Jacket
Details of 1800-30 Undress Jacket
Details of 1800-30 Undress Jacket

Early 1800s to 1830s Antique Regency Georgian Dressing Boudoir Night Jacket Undress – with Dorset Buttons

A jacket such as this would have been worn as ‘early morning’ or ‘undress’ attire, when one would possibly write letters and instruct servants, and perhaps see only members of their own family. It also could have been worn as a night jacket, when sitting up in bed.

This white cotton Regency jacket is very roomy, and very simply but beautifully made. The large collar is made from a rectangle of fabric. There are narrow and long under arm gores, and the body of the jacket looks like rectangular pieces of fabric which are gathered at the neckline, very little if any shaping. There are the triangular gores under the collar towards the neck. There is one Dorset button under the collar which can’t be seen, one about a third of the way down the front, and one to each wrist.
A name has been written on in ink. The first name is ‘Ann’, but I am not sure about the surname as it is a little blurred.

Late Georgian 1700s Child's cap
Late Georgian 1700s Child’s Cap

Georgian Late 1700s Child’s Cap

This cap has been made from 3 sections (as was the style in the 1700s) of tamboured or chainstitched gauze. Then around the cap is a pleated linen fabric with narrow handmade lace. The inside is lined with another loose weave fabric, most probably muslin. To the centre back is a drawstring to bring it in a little. The main section of the cap and the lace trim is a lovely cream colour, and the linen ruffles are an off-white. On the inside have been added tiny handsewn bars at intervals. I’m afraid that I cannot fathom their use at all!

Measurements:
From Centre Back to Front one side~ 7″ or 17.8cm
From Top to Bottom~ 8″ or 20cm

c.1830s-1850s Tambour Net Veil
c.1830s-1850s Tambour Net Veil

 

c.1830-1850s Antique Victorian Bonnet Veil or Apron White Tamboured Net

How beautiful this would have looked on a bonnet from the early Victorian era, or as a very delicate apron. It is a net ground, with tamboured motifs. There is a narrow border on the sides, with a wider one along the bottom, and those 6 large motifs in the body of the net. I love the flower heads in the large motifs; they have eyes with smiley faces! There are a couple of patches where the work looks unfinished, a petal missing here, and leaf unfinished here, although of course those parts could have unravelled over time. The top of the veil/apron still has the gathering stitches and cotton thread.

Measurements:-
Width~ 39″ or 99cm
Length~ 21″ or 53.5cm

Late 1890s/early 1900s Bust Shaper
Late 1890s/early 1900s Bust Shaper
c.1900s Bust Improver
c.1900s Bust Improver

Boned Edwardian Bust Bodice Bust Improver Late 1890s Early 1900s Antique – Bust 32″

Now you don’t come across one of these everyday. It is a really super item, and even has the original silk ribbon. These structural bust improvers were used to create the ‘mono bosom’ or ‘pouter pigeon’ look of the late 19th and early 20th century. They were worn over the corset.
Construction:
This bust bodice is made with plastic boning over a cotton net. It is therefore so light and easy to wear. There is a wide lace trim around the top with a light green silk ribbon insertion. This item is machine made. It is worn by passing the cotton tape shoulder straps through loops at the side, and is then ties at the back centre.
It has its original maker’s label inside- ‘J. Rosenbaum & Sons Corset Makers London’.
Measurements:
This is made for a small lady. It sits well on my mannequin, which has a 32″ bust.
Bust~ 32″ (81cm)